Gods die when the visions they support disintegrate. They do not die, however, at the same time or in the same way for everyone. Even if the death of God does take place, in one way or another, that passing does not mean so much that religious ending has been reached but that beginnings have been made possible for new and different encounters with the source and ground of our being within history itself.

Gods die when the visions they support disintegrate. They do not die, however, at the same time or in the same way for everyone. Even if the death of God does take place, in one way or another, that passing does not mean so much that religious ending has been reached but that beginnings have been made possible for new and different encounters with the source and ground of our being within history itself.
John K. Roth, “The Holocaust, Genocide, and Radical Theology: An Assessment of the Death of God Movement” in Stephen R Haynes and John K. Roth, eds., The Death of God Movement and the Holocaust: Radical Theology Encounters the Shoah (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999), 74. Italics mine.

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