Is Honesty Worth It?

Picture by Brozovich

I often receive negative feedback when I share my views on religion in general and on Christianity in particular. Some call me names (“liberal,” “heathen,” etc.), some don’t listen to anything I say and just keep repeating that I am wrong and they are right, and others “know” that I’m not really a Christian anyway – I mean, how could I be a Christian if I don’t believe exactly like they do? So, I’m asking you, is it worth it to you to be honest about your beliefs, even when you know the person you’re being honest with is going to push back hard against what you’re saying?

I believe it’s worth it for me, but that doesn’t make it any easier. The insults, assumptions, etc. become tiresome after a while. Nonetheless, I have worked at being more honest about my beliefs as of late, because I feel I have a responsibility to let others know (even if it’s only 1 or 2) that they aren’t alone in thinking their thoughts, they aren’t alone in asking questions.

Are you always honest about your thoughts/beliefs about religion?

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2 thoughts on “Is Honesty Worth It?

  1. I wish I could say I were always as honest as you are, but no, I’m not. Too often I keep quiet about my beliefs to “keep the peace” with friends and family members who I know disagree with me. In the past, disagreements over such deeply held beliefs have permanently destroyed relationships that were important to me. I guess I fear losing more people in my life. Only with my most trusted friends who disagree with me do I feel free to express my beliefs openly. Those relationships don’t seem as fragile. And of course, if I know I am in a group of people who believe like I do, I’m not shy about my opinions at all. But I would never be bold enough to share things on Facebook like you do! The majority of my “friends” there would hang me out to dry, I’m afraid.

  2. I recently preached a sermon on the troublesome story of Ananias and Saphira (Acts 5). In the sermon, I referenced Paul’s description of the church/community as the “body of Christ.” Outside of the Adam’s Family, there are no such things as free-floating appendages (Thing). Therefore, when Ananias and Saphira (members of the body) fail to be honest with the community, they severed themselves off from the life source that the body offers. That said, I am painfully aware that the body many of us have experienced is not the ideal that a reading such as this assumes. Many of us have found the body life-taking rather than life-affirming. However, I am convinced that we cannot give up striving for that ideal community where transparency is normative and life-giving. I applaud and thank you for your honesty. It is a hint of the Kingdom realized.

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